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UPDATED: Whiny Sears Customer Gets Great Service

I'm pretty much fed up with reading about whiny, ignorant morons on Consumerist.com, so I've added a new category: Whiners.

Today's case in point: A whiny Sears customer whines to Consumerist:

I called to have the refrigerator repaired and on August 28th a repairman came to my apartment. After examining the refrigerator he determined the part that was needed had to be ordered. He said that it was Sears's policy for the delivery of the part to take ten business days.
Sounds fair to me ... what's the rub?
At that point I informed the repairman that my wife and daughter are insulin dependent and their insulin requires refrigeration.
Ahh ... now I see. You're wife and child are insulin dependent diabetics, which makes this guy an asshole now ... I get it ... No ... I don't get it. I am an insulin dependent diabetic, and if I was told my refrigerator needed parts for repair that were guaranteed in 10 days, I would be glad. I would be glad that I had a guarantee that it would -*only*- be ten days, and I would sort out my meds myself. In fact, at the point that my refrigerator is broken to the point of calling for repair, I would have already sorted out my insulin, and it would be a moot point. Not for this asshole:
I asked the repairman to use my phone to call his office to inform his superiors that my wife and daughter are diabetic and their medicine requires refrigeration at all times. The repairman refused to call his office on my phone. He repeated that it was Sears' policy that it would take ten days and picked up his bag and left my apartment.
Why is it the repairman's responsibility to sort out their medication? Where in the contract does is say that Sears guarantee's 24/7/365 access to refrigeration? Basically what the repairman is trying to politely tell this guy is that his piece is done ... you want to sort out something else with Sears, leave me out of it. I'm done. That's not good enough for this ignoramus, so he persists:
I followed the repairman to the elevator and asked him to give me his name. He refused. The repairman said I should call the office and state that a repairman had been to my apartment. While demanding that he at least tell me his name I held the elevator door open to prevent the repairman from leaving. The repairman exited the elevator and walked towards our staircase. I asked him again in the hallway what is your name. He finally muttered Brian. I said what is your full name and he replied "JESUS CHRIST!"
At what point is the repairman allowed to start using force to get away from this psycho? Look dumbass, it's not the repairman's fault your wife and daughter are diabetic, and it's not Sears' responsibility to sort out their meds. That is -*you're*- job as a father, and you should see to it. Leave the repairman the f@#$k alone, and take care of your family.

You would think that at some point self-preservation of one's self and family would kick in, but these types of people think that everything should be handed to them on a silver platter. It's like Denis Leary said ... "Life's tough ... get a f@#$ing helmet."

UPDATE: Not satisfied with just whining, Consumerist has posted the email address of the Sears CEO Aylwin B. Lewis. That'll learn 'em!

Comments

I didn't see the customer's mention of his family's medical needs as making it Sears' (aka K-mart's) responsibility. I too would have been caught off guard if I had been told it would take 10 days for a part, especially because of "policy". What kind of policy says we will take 10 days to get your part...? Anyway, a fridge is important to most of us in the USA, diabetic or not. What I have a problem with is the "service" man hiding behind the "policy". Companies that empower their employees to do the right thing are much more successful than companies that teach their reps to hide behind "policy". Ask Dell Computers - they have a horrible customer service rating just for this very reason. There is a reason Sears is now owned by K-Mart, and K-Mart had to close all their stores in TX. You have to treat the customer right, and in this case, this representative of Sears did not. I wouldn't expect the service person to pull a rabbit out of their hat, but they could have given some guidance or offered some direction to expedite things. This was a customer caught off guard and in a state of panic. It happens, and when you are someone who deals with the general public, you should have the tools and training to do so properly. Any company which does not does so at it's own peril.
I know that after being treated like that (and I have been by "service" reps from the now defunct Montgomery Wards) I stopped using that company and told everyone I could. It is important to let others know about good and poor service. One man's whining is another man's arsenal for informed decisioning.

I think this guy is just a whining asshole hiding behind the "Buh buh my wife and kid are diabetic! Fix my problem NOW!" Call it bad service, or whatever you will, but when a company lives up to their contracted duties, for my money, that's good enough for me. I wouldn't expect them to break the rules for me just because I'm diabetic.

I know for a fact that Verizon Telecommunication (The Phone Co.) has training secession for their representivatives to go beyond their "job description" to help the customer. N.J. Bell & Bell Atlantic (prior to Verizon) both had programs that enforced this training. Remember when a customer gets madder than hell, he will change his phone co. This should be for all companies if their customer do not like how the customer rep. treates them. That Sears repair rep. could have had called his office to see if the part for the refrigerator could be shipped before the 5 to 10 business days. And do not forget that it would take a few more days to have the part installed.

I know for a fact that Verizon Telecommunication (The Phone Co.) has training secession for their representivatives to go beyond their "job description" to help the customer. N.J. Bell & Bell Atlantic (prior to Verizon) both had programs that enforced this training. Remember when a customer gets madder than hell, he will change his phone co. This should be for all companies if their customer do not like how the customer rep. treates them. That Sears repair rep. could have had called his office to see if the part for the refrigerator could be shipped before the 5 to 10 business days. And do not forget that it would take a few more days to have the part installed.

I work for sears CCS, and I am glad to see that people out there understand things like this! The reason it takes 10 days (which is not applicable for all parts) Is because we have to order parts in sometimes. They come from a warehouse house which needs to fill and ship the order to the service depot the tech is dispatched from, then the techs routing is scheduled around the part ETA> Depending on the age of the fridge, parts may have to come directly from source, which can take up to 2 weeks. But people don't understand that. They only want instant resolution regardless of the item the company or the situation. In most cases when we have a situation where a customers meds need storing we'll try to get them a loaner at the local store *IE a bar fridge) which we deliver and take away!.. But he feels the need to haggle the tech, not ask for the customer service # so he missed out.

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